Post-Bleph Dry Eye Syndrome

November 20, 2020
Katie Hobbins

Dr. Stephen Perkins explains the incidence and treatment of dry eye syndrome and chemosis in patients post-blepharoplasty.

At the 2020 American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) virtual meeting, Stephen Perkins, MD, facial plastic surgeon, Meridian Plastic Surgery Center, Indianapolis, Ind., discussed the incidence of and treatment options for exacerbated dry eye syndrome post-blepharoplasty.

In his presentation, “Dry Eye Syndrome After Blepharoplasty with Treatment Alternatives for Severe Chemosis,” Dr. Perkins explains that in an interview and research study conducted by Jess Prischmann, MD, and himself, about 26% of his patients complained of varying degrees of dry eye symptoms prior to blepharoplasty procedure, and up to 36% of patients experienced symptoms post-procedure.

Study parameters included procedures of upper and lower blepharoplasty or only lower blepharoplasty using a transcutaneous approach skin muscle flap with a suture suspension.

Dr. Perkins explains that dry eye symptoms can last four to six weeks, and sometimes eight weeks. In some cases, patients have to use eyedrops for their symptoms indefinitely.

As treatment for dry eye syndrome, he suggests gel at night and eyedrops during the day. In severe chemosis cases, he uses steroid eye drops, tapes the eyelid up to help minimize the issue and, when necessary, performs a surgical conjunctivectomy to speed up resolution of the problem. In chemosis cases, it can take up to three months to heal.

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